Latest Articles



Medical Advice of the Stars
Volume 39, No. 1
December / January 2019

It’s a funny thing that many people take amateur medical (or “wellness”) advice seriously if it comes from a shiny blonde movie star with a pleasing smile. The public doesn’t flock to buy health products promoted by car mechanics or dog groomers, but people who read lines in front of a camera—now that’s a whole …

Escape to Exile
Volume 38, No. 6
October / November 2018

September 30 is International Blasphemy Rights Day, an observance founded by the Center for Inquiry (CFI). In this issue, we spotlight one of the courageous writers imperiled for writing critically of religion who has received aid from CFI’s Secular Rescue program. Ghluam Kabir (not his real name) was an admin for the Facebook page Pakistani …

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Looking Back



The Debate over Enhancements (Introduction)
Volume 32, No. 1
December / January 2012

Through drugs and implanted medical devices, we can now enhance the capacities of humans. The changes brought about so far are still relatively minor (for example, using Ritalin to increase the ability to concentrate), but it’s highly likely that we will develop the means to modify an increasing variety of human traits within ten to …


Enhancement Anxiety
Volume 32, No. 1
December / January 2012

A problem with the current debates about emerging technologies is that they really are debates—plural. Reasonable policy approaches to embryonic sex selection, for example, or to human reproductive cloning, if it were available, might not generalize to more radical technologies that could reverse the aging process, dramatically increase our cognitive capacities, alter the gross morphology …


Against the Enhancement Project: Two Perspectives
Volume 32, No. 1
December / January 2012
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  Perspective 1 Adrienne Asch Proponents of so-called moderate genetic enhancements contend that we nee dn’t worry much about possible upgrades to future human beings because they will not be transformative. Proponents of more radical enhancements endorse possible radical changes to humans that might come from their envisioned radical genetic and biotechnological innovations. Like other …


The Debate over Enhancements (Introduction)
Volume 32, No. 1
December / January 2012

Through drugs and implanted medical devices, we can now enhance the capacities of humans. The changes brought about so far are still relatively minor (for example, using Ritalin to increase the ability to concentrate), but it’s highly likely that we will develop the means to modify an increasing variety of human traits within ten to …


Enhancement Anxiety
Volume 32, No. 1
December / January 2012

A problem with the current debates about emerging technologies is that they really are debates—plural. Reasonable policy approaches to embryonic sex selection, for example, or to human reproductive cloning, if it were available, might not generalize to more radical technologies that could reverse the aging process, dramatically increase our cognitive capacities, alter the gross morphology …