Secular Humanists Return to Washington

D.J. Grothe

Will secular humanists ever succeed in organizing so as to wield political influence in our nation’s capital? Once again, we’re going to try.

In Washington, D.C., from April 11 to 13, the Council for Secular Humanism will host a national conference entitled “One Nation Without God? Secularism, Society, and Justice.” Session topics include religious-political extremism, church-state separation, gay rights and secular humanism, new religious threats to secular education in America, international humanist activism, and more. Featured speakers include Christopher Hitchens, a columnist for Vanity Fair and Free Inquiry; Dr. Eugenie Scott, executive director of the National Center for Science Education; Susan Jacoby, author and former Washington Post reporter; Michael Newdow, plaintiff in the Pledge of Allegiance case; Ibn Warraq, author of What the Koran Really Says; Barry Lynn, executive director of Americans United for Separation of Church and State; and many others.

Rooms and special student discounts are guaranteed for a limited time, so hurry and register now! Call 1-800-458-1366 or visit www.secularhumanism.org for more details.

Other Activities Endorsed Or Sponsored By The Council And Cfi

March 13–16, 2003. Campus Freethought Alliance visits New York City campuses, including Columbia University, New York University, and others, presenting “Voltaire and the Challenge of the New Enlightenment.” For more information or to get involved in other campus outreach, see www.campusfreethought.org.

April 1, 2003. April Fool’s Day. Use this day to parody or expose some of the foolish beliefs in our society. If you’re a member of a secular humanist or skeptic society, expose the nonsensical ideas that circulate within paranormal communities, such as faith-healing, dowsing, and séances; prepare informational materials to educate your members and the general public about these foolish beliefs. For more information, see www.secularsea-sons.org.

April 23, 2003. A live discussion between David Noebel and DJ Grothe at Georgetown University entitled: “Clergy in the Classroom: Is Secular Humanism the Religion of the Public Schools?” David Noebel is co-author of the New York Times best-selling book attacking secular humanism, Mind Siege: The Battle for Truth in the New Millennium. See www.campusfreethought.org for more information.

May 8, 2003. The Day of Reason, also known as the Rational Day of Thought, provides an alternative to counter the successful National Day of Prayer. More information can be found at www.secularseasons.org.

What You Can Do Today

I invite you to register for the Council’s upcoming conference in Washington, D.C. In addition to the topics already mentioned, the conference will have sessions on secular humanist activism. There will also be opportunities for readers of Free Inquiry to support our campus outreach program, the Campus Freethought Alliance, the world’s largest affiliation of skeptic and secular humanist college and high school students, faculty, and staff.

There are other ways that you can help the Council for Secular Humanism celebrate reason and humanity. Share a Free Inquiry gift-subscription with secular and humanist college and high-school students and friends in your region. Become an associate member of the Council for Secular Humanism, North America’s leading organization for ethical, nonreligious people. And get involved with the secular humanist society in your area!


DJ Grothe is field director for the Council for Secular Humanism.

 

D.J. Grothe

D.J. Grothe is on the Board of Directors for the Institute for Science and Human Values, and is a speaker on various topics that touch on the intersection of education, science and belief. He was once the president of the James Randi Educational Foundation and was former Director of Outreach Programs for the Center for Inquiry and associate editor of Free Inquiry magazine. He hosted the weekly radio show and podcast Point of Inquiry, exploring the implications of the scientific outlook with leading thinkers.


Will secular humanists ever succeed in organizing so as to wield political influence in our nation’s capital? Once again, we’re going to try. In Washington, D.C., from April 11 to 13, the Council for Secular Humanism will host a national conference entitled “One Nation Without God? Secularism, Society, and Justice.” Session topics include religious-political extremism, …

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