Clear Proof America Is Not a ‘Christian Nation’

John Tomasin

Though some religious activists keep claiming that America was “founded as a Christian nation,” the historical proofs are opposite and in writing. The activists say the Declaration of Independence proves the “Christian nation” claim because it cites our God and Creator; but the purpose of the Declaration was to cite the source of our right to freedom from Great Britain, not to set up the government in America, which was an entirely different undertaking.

This was done later by our Constitution, in which the Founders deliberately omitted reference to God or Creator, forbade any religious tests for public office (Article VI), and provided for separation of church and state (the First Amendment) to establish a “more perfect union”—not a “Christian nation,” which they could easily have formed, had they so desired. They did not so desire.

Further proof positive is the American treaty of 1797 that ended conflict with Tripoli (Treaties of the United States, Volume 2, Document 20, Article 11). It specifically states that “the government of the United States is not in any sense founded on the Christian religion” (emphasis added).

This treaty was unanimously approved by the U.S. Senate and signed by President John Adams in 1797. No dissent was heard from George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and many other Founders then alive and active.

Since its founding, the nation and religion have prospered. For religious zealots to press a claim they know to be untrue actually discredits religion.

John Tomasin

John Tomasin is a retired attorney and judge.


Though some religious activists keep claiming that America was “founded as a Christian nation,” the historical proofs are opposite and in writing. The activists say the Declaration of Independence proves the “Christian nation” claim because it cites our God and Creator; but the purpose of the Declaration was to cite the source of our right …

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