Latest Articles


Telling and Selling the Overpopulation Issue: Why Climate Change Gets So Much More Attention
Volume 40, No. 1
December 2019 / January 2020

Search the literature; read the news; comb the mission statements and recommendations of various environmental nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and it will become obvious how climate change utterly dominates public discourse, leaving the overpopulation issue behind. The average global per-person carbon footprint is 4.9 metric tons per year, according to the Global Footprint Network. Multiplied by …


In Bladensburg Cross Case, New Justices Help Set a New Course: Backward
Volume 40, No. 1
December 2019 / January 2020

It’s funny how a group of smart fourteen- and fifteen-year-olds using logic and cogent argument can one-up today’s U.S. Supreme Court. It happened in an Advanced Placement U.S. Government class at Frederick Douglass High School in Upper Marlboro, Maryland. According to the Washington Post, teacher Tessa Guarracino assigned the Bladensburg Cross case as a moot-court …

Subscribe to the Humanist magazine you can trust

Enjoy print or online access to the latest Free Inquiry articles on your computer, phone, or tablet!

Curious About What's Next?

For the questions that remain unanswered after we’ve cleared our minds of gods and souls and spirits, many atheists, agnostics, skeptics, and freethinkers turn to secular humanism.

Looking Back



Introduction
Volume 32, No. 2
February / March 2012

By any measure, the period since the mid-twentieth century has been a golden age for both the science of sociology and the discipline (or business) of opinion polling. Never before have so many Americans been surveyed, measured, and compared on so many indices and by so many specialists. Still, across the age of surveys, men …


The Social Science of Secularity
Volume 32, No. 2
February / March 2012

Something novel happened during this century’s first decade: Social scientists (re)discovered the nonreligious. Call it “reaching critical ma ss” or a “tipping point,” but suddenly quite a few researchers in quite a few places began to focus their attention directly on the nonreligious—not just as a foil for better understanding the religious but as a …


Who Are These Doubters Anyway?
Volume 32, No. 2
February / March 2012

We seem to be poised on the threshold of a bright new era in which nonreligious Americans will be properly studied by the social sciences. What better time to review what we know about the various flavors of religious nonaffiliation and nonbelief? And what better time to review the facts and fallacies that have shaped …


Introduction
Volume 32, No. 2
February / March 2012

By any measure, the period since the mid-twentieth century has been a golden age for both the science of sociology and the discipline (or business) of opinion polling. Never before have so many Americans been surveyed, measured, and compared on so many indices and by so many specialists. Still, across the age of surveys, men …


The Social Science of Secularity
Volume 32, No. 2
February / March 2012

Something novel happened during this century’s first decade: Social scientists (re)discovered the nonreligious. Call it “reaching critical ma ss” or a “tipping point,” but suddenly quite a few researchers in quite a few places began to focus their attention directly on the nonreligious—not just as a foil for better understanding the religious but as a …