Latest Articles



Prodding Nones to Vote
Volume 39, No. 4
June / July 2019

Progressives hope for an America where health care is a human right for everyone, women’s right to choose remains secure, gays are safe from cruelty, people of all sorts are welcome equally in a multicultural society, college is affordable without crushing debt, marijuana no longer brings jail terms, safety measures curb gun massacres, sensible steps …


Are the Nones Up for Challenging the Religious Right?
Volume 39, No. 4
June / July 2019

In the 1950s, more than 95 percent of Americans identified as Christian. Sixty years later, much has changed. The number of self-identified Christians now hovers around 70 percent, and there has been a striking increase in the number of people who, when asked to name their religious preference, reply by saying “none.” As a member …

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Curious About What's Next?

For the questions that remain unanswered after we’ve cleared our minds of gods and souls and spirits, many atheists, agnostics, skeptics, and freethinkers turn to secular humanism.

Looking Back



Introduction
Volume 31, No. 4
June / July 2011

When the Council for Secular Humanism celebrated its thirtieth anniversary at last October’s gala conference in Los Angeles, one of the most-anticipated sessions was a panel discussion on freethinkers’ attitudes toward religion. Should secular humanists, atheists, agnostics, and others of our ilk approach religion from a presumption of confrontation—or one of accommodation? New York Times …


The Need for Accommodation
Volume 31, No. 4
June / July 2011

Five years ago, I was in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, at the Kitzmiller v. Dover trial. The trial concerned the legality of a policy of teaching intelligent design (ID) in Dover, Pennsylvania, public schools. The National Center for Science Education (NCSE), my organization, acted as advisor to the plaintiff’s legal team on scientific, pedagogical, and religious issues …


The Need for Confrontation
Volume 31, No. 4
June / July 2011

I’m going to begin with where I entered this conflict—and make no mistake, it’s a real battle—with my experience in science education and specifically with the teaching of evolution. Biology has been a lifelong passion for me, and when I first began teaching back in the 1980s, it was a shock to discover students who …


Introduction
Volume 31, No. 4
June / July 2011

When the Council for Secular Humanism celebrated its thirtieth anniversary at last October’s gala conference in Los Angeles, one of the most-anticipated sessions was a panel discussion on freethinkers’ attitudes toward religion. Should secular humanists, atheists, agnostics, and others of our ilk approach religion from a presumption of confrontation—or one of accommodation? New York Times …


The Need for Accommodation
Volume 31, No. 4
June / July 2011

Five years ago, I was in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, at the Kitzmiller v. Dover trial. The trial concerned the legality of a policy of teaching intelligent design (ID) in Dover, Pennsylvania, public schools. The National Center for Science Education (NCSE), my organization, acted as advisor to the plaintiff’s legal team on scientific, pedagogical, and religious issues …