Latest Articles


Telling and Selling the Overpopulation Issue: Why Climate Change Gets So Much More Attention
Volume 40, No. 1
December 2019 / January 2020

Search the literature; read the news; comb the mission statements and recommendations of various environmental nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and it will become obvious how climate change utterly dominates public discourse, leaving the overpopulation issue behind. The average global per-person carbon footprint is 4.9 metric tons per year, according to the Global Footprint Network. Multiplied by …


In Bladensburg Cross Case, New Justices Help Set a New Course: Backward
Volume 40, No. 1
December 2019 / January 2020

It’s funny how a group of smart fourteen- and fifteen-year-olds using logic and cogent argument can one-up today’s U.S. Supreme Court. It happened in an Advanced Placement U.S. Government class at Frederick Douglass High School in Upper Marlboro, Maryland. According to the Washington Post, teacher Tessa Guarracino assigned the Bladensburg Cross case as a moot-court …

Subscribe to the Humanist magazine you can trust

Enjoy print or online access to the latest Free Inquiry articles on your computer, phone, or tablet!

Curious About What's Next?

For the questions that remain unanswered after we’ve cleared our minds of gods and souls and spirits, many atheists, agnostics, skeptics, and freethinkers turn to secular humanism.

Looking Back



Introduction
Volume 29, No. 1
December 2008 / January 2009

What is the future of religion? Is it even meaningful to speak of “religion” as an entity with a single future, or can we speak only of individual religions that wax and wane? For generations, humanists, atheists, and freethinkers (along with most sociologists) expected religion-as-a-whole to decline in the wake of expanding education and prosperity. …


The Big Religion Questions Finally Solved
Volume 29, No. 1
December 2008 / January 2009

Advanced sociological research has determined that dysfunctional socioeconomic factors are responsible for the origin and historical popularity of religious faith and that sci ence, secure prosperity, and consumerism are radically undermining faith all across the first world. Contrary to naysayers, the so-called secularization hypothesis (which predicts that social and scientific advances will drive a gradual …


The Great God Debate and the Future of Faith
Volume 29, No. 1
December 2008 / January 2009

The “Great God Debate” that ushered in the twenty-first century of our so-called Common Era brought atheism to the top of U.S. best-seller lists. This in itself i s historic: nothing quite like it has happened since the 1890s, when Mark Twain, Robert Ingersoll, and Jack London—world-class nonbelievers all—held mass audiences spellbound with their radical …


Introduction
Volume 29, No. 1
December 2008 / January 2009

What is the future of religion? Is it even meaningful to speak of “religion” as an entity with a single future, or can we speak only of individual religions that wax and wane? For generations, humanists, atheists, and freethinkers (along with most sociologists) expected religion-as-a-whole to decline in the wake of expanding education and prosperity. …


The Big Religion Questions Finally Solved
Volume 29, No. 1
December 2008 / January 2009

Advanced sociological research has determined that dysfunctional socioeconomic factors are responsible for the origin and historical popularity of religious faith and that sci ence, secure prosperity, and consumerism are radically undermining faith all across the first world. Contrary to naysayers, the so-called secularization hypothesis (which predicts that social and scientific advances will drive a gradual …